It’s now mid-August, and the hottest summer days are upon us. If you are moving to a new home this month and have pets, you will want to take a few simple steps to ensure that Fido and Fluffy remain safe in the heat. A move can be stressful enough for our furry family, but the added heat can make them more prone to physical problems.

Pets are at risk for hyperthermia in hot environments. The normal range of body temperature for dogs and cats typically ranges from 100 to 102.5F. Hyperthermia becomes dangerous when body temperatures rise above 104F. As temperatures rise above that, your pet may suffer from heat stroke, vomiting, diarrhea, collapse, seizure activity, multi-system organ failure, coma, and death.

Luckily, if you prepare for the possibility of heat-related problems during your relocation, your pets should be just fine. But, keep your veterinarian’s phone number at hand just in case.

Keep Them Hydrated

Water makes up close to 70-80 percent of a cat or dog’s body mass. It is absolutely essential to keep cool water always available. A loss of only 10 percent of their body fluids can result in serious problems. You may want to consider feeding them fresh, moist, and whole-foods instead of kibble on the day of the move.

Keep Them Quiet During the Hottest Part of the Day

Take them out for exercise early in the morning and later in the evening, and let them rest between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. In fact, if it’s really hot, you may want to follow this advice yourself while loading the moving truck.

Make Shade Available

If your pets are outdoors, ensure they have a safe, shady spot to rest in while the work is taking place. Constant exposure to the sun can raise their body temperature.

Don’t Leave them in a Hot Car

We hear about this every summer. Leaving your pets confined in a car can have dire consequences. You will be busy with the move, and it may be easy to forget that your furry family is waiting patiently to be unloaded from the car.

Remember,  A Stanford University Medical Center study determined that the temperature inside a vehicle can increase by an average of 40 degrees Fahrenheit within 60 minutes (over half of a degree per minute), regardless of the outside temperature. Even if you plan to be away from the car only a brief period, you can be delayed by unexpected circumstances during a busy move. Take care of Fido and Fluffy first before unloading the boxes. They will be much safer in their new home rather than left in a hot car.

Turn on the Air Conditioning

If it is especially hot, you may want to leave the electricity on at your former home for moving day. You can also ensure that the electricity is on at your final destination. This way, you have the option of leaving the air conditioner or fans on during the heat of the day.

Summer is the busy season for moving. It is also the hottest time to relocate, and our pets need only a little extra attention to keep them cool and healthy. For more information on designing a smooth move that fits within your budget, contact your personal Global Van Lines Moving Concierge, who is dedicated to assisting you with every aspect of a relocation free of charge.

The hottest summer days are upon us. If you are moving to a new home this summer and have pets, take a few simple steps to ensure that Roxy and Whiskers remain safe in the heat. A move can be stressful enough for our furry family, but the added heat can cause even more problems.

Keep Them Hydrated

Water makes up close to 70-80 percent of a cat or dog’s body mass. It is absolutely essential to keep cool water always available. A loss of only 10 percent of their body fluids can result in serious problems. You may want to consider feeding them fresh, moist, and whole-foods instead of kibble on the day of the move.

Keep Activity Levels Low During the Hottest Part of the Day

Take them out for exercise early in the morning and later in the evening, and let them rest during the hottest part of the day.

Make Shade Available

If your pets are outdoors, ensure they have a safe, shady spot to rest in while the work is taking place. Constant exposure to the sun can raise their body temperature.

Don’t Leave them in a Hot Car

We hear about this every summer. Leaving your pets confined in a car can be fatal You will be busy with the move, and it may be easy to forget that your furry family is waiting patiently to be unloaded from the car.

Remember,  the temperature inside a vehicle can increase by an average of 40 degrees Fahrenheit within 60 minutes (over half of a degree per minute), regardless of the outside temperature. Even if you plan to be away from the car only a brief period, you can be delayed by unexpected circumstances during a busy move. Take care of your pets first before unloading the boxes. They will be much safer in their new home rather than left in a hot car.

Air Conditioning

If it is especially hot, you may want to leave the electricity on at your former home for moving day. You can also ensure that the electricity is on at your final destination. This way, you have the option of leaving the air conditioner or fans on during the heat of the day.

If you prepare for the possibility of heat-related problems during your relocation, your pets should be just fine. But, keep your veterinarian’s phone number at hand just in case.

Summer is the busy season for moving. It is also the hottest time to relocate, and our pets need only a little extra attention to keep them cool and healthy. For more information on designing a smooth move that fits within your budget, contact the experts at Mike the Mover.